Author Topic: Articulated Line  (Read 1970 times)

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Yacine

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Re: Articulated Line
« Reply #30 on: September 16, 2018, 06:05:15 AM »
... we're almost there  :o .

Added some gimmiks ... and wishes (wishes, not requests! Thought you would enjoy some challenges ;) ).
« Last Edit: September 16, 2018, 06:08:13 AM by Yacine »
Yacine

Hey Ken

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Re: Articulated Line
« Reply #31 on: September 17, 2018, 08:59:29 AM »
Messrs. W. and Y:

   So while I spent the weekend answering political surveys and filming TV commercials, you guys were having all the fun.  Clearly, there’s something out of kilter with my priorities.

   The cylinder is virtually perfect!  Exactly what I was looking for, except for one very important feature: it does not cater to my predilection for laziness.  Why should I have to diddle the control point whenever I change the topology of the shape?  Fortunately, it was a short step to correcting it: In the group’s control point’s Y cell, I substituted the elegant BOUND function for a blunt Height/Width*0.05.  So now it stays the same constant height regardless of what I throw at it (at least for ratios less than 1, but that’s far too minor to matter).  Regardless, it solves my problem.  Many thanks!!  Remind me to cut your taxes.

   As for that pesky articulated line, it’s much closer to where it should be.  Still needs the second arrowhead to be added plus some bounding on both arrows, but otherwise it’s where it should be.  I’ll dig into all that after November 6th.

   Thanks again!

   - Ken

Ken V. Krawchuk
Libertarian for Pennsylvania Governor (retired)
KenK4Pa.com

wapperdude

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Re: Articulated Line
« Reply #32 on: September 18, 2018, 11:26:12 AM »
Adding double-arrowheads wasn't that difficult.  It took 3 new geometry sections, one for each line segment.  If you select double arrowheads from the GUI, it automatically gives them.  There is a minimum spacing function that prevents the arrowheads from overlapping based upon lineweight and segment length.  There is no adjustment based upon arrowhead size.  If the length gets longer, the spacing will increase, as a percentage of that length.  The arrowheads are spaced symmetrically about the control point.  They are not independently placeable.

Wrt to limiting the range of the arrowhead placements, that bound to be a problem.  It's a four quadrant issue.  More than I care to get into at this point.

At a minimum, you have a starting place for doing the double arrowhead problem.

Then, there's this challenge to forum members...this development was based upon V2007.  Since then, there's new features in the object model, to wit, point along a curve.  So, the challenge is to re-work the approach using more up-to-date approach.   :o ::)

Yep.  There I've said it.

Wapperdude
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Hey Ken

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Re: Articulated Line
« Reply #33 on: September 19, 2018, 11:17:39 AM »
Folks:

   Of course when you have a solution in hand, you always try to improve it.  So having a grouped solution, I took it further to attempt an ungrouped solution.  Well, I found one – except for one basic problem: Fill doesn’t fill the entire shape.  I did some searching about, but to no avail.  The best I found was an article by John Goldsmith that acknowledged my problem without saying how to correct it.  He said, “By default, the boolean rules governing overlapping geometries means that the rectangle geometry will be given the fill and the three Ellipse geometries will be empty.”

   How do you change that default?  I tried tricks with Join, Union, etc., but to no avail.  All of them re-introduced the behavior the shape is meant to eliminate.  I also tried replacing the ellipse (whose shape I like) with two elliptical arcs, but it has the same problem (aside from being less pretty).

   My latest it attached containing both the grouped and ungrouped shapes.  (You can ignore the untoward behavior of the ungrouped's bottom arc -- I know how to fix that, but there's no point in fixing a secondary problem until you fix the showstopper.)  All I want is to have the color fill the entire ellipsy shape.  Any suggestions?  Besides “Give up!” that is?

   - Ken

Ken V. Krawchuk
Libertarian for Pennsylvania Governor (retired)
KenK4Pa.com

wapperdude

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Re: Articulated Line
« Reply #34 on: September 19, 2018, 06:03:53 PM »
Here's ungrouped approach.  I left the control point in to convenient set the oval height...orange shape 1st page.  But, the height now remains constant with both width and height changes.
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wapperdude

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Re: Articulated Line
« Reply #35 on: September 19, 2018, 06:18:19 PM »
Well, while I'm at it., another, non-grouped option.  Call this fun with fills.

The controlling cell is the GeometryXXX.NoFil cell.  This cell, as  previously mentioned, has a Boolean personality.  So, where two geometry sections overlap, there lies the Boolean interaction.  The fourth shape is designed such that there is maximal options: 
  1)  Full shape fill
  2)  No shape fill
  3)  Only oval shape fill
  4)  Only cylinder wall fill

Just play with the true/false, i.e., 1 / 0, settings of the geometry.nofill cells.

Wapperdude
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Hey Ken

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Re: Articulated Line
« Reply #36 on: September 20, 2018, 07:47:29 AM »

   0.4886*User.Thk^-1.015??  Of course!  Why didn’t I think of that!  It’s so obvious!  (NOT!)

   Good plan, splitting my ellipse into two elliptical arcs.  Understandable, and your piecing them together kept the illusion of an oval better than I could manage.  It’s that highly-intuitive 0.4886*User.Thk^-1.015 that did the trick.

   We have a real winner here with your final shape, Wapperdude, what with the constant topologies, color choices and all.  It’s all I could ask for, and more!  Thanks!!

   Henceforth I shall refer to it as The Wappershape. 

   - Ken

Ken V. Krawchuk
Libertarian for Pennsylvania Governor (retired)
KenK4Pa.com

wapperdude

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Re: Articulated Line
« Reply #37 on: September 20, 2018, 11:12:06 AM »
...or perhaps wapper-thebull-dawg?   ???

As for being intuitively obvious, well, it wasn't.  I knew that cell helped keep things looking elliptical.  But, was there a nice expression to define it.  Trial and error with different settings proved that a linear relationship was unlikely.  From my past life, when I earned money to make a living, I remembered using Excel to do curve fitting and finding trends.  So, taking a proper amount of data points, I then let excel find the necessary equation.  As they say in England...Brilliant!  LOL.

The coloring scheme thing with the NoFill cell was again experience with such a thing.  I have a JuneTheSecond post to help me recognize the interaction with multiple geometry sections.  You, subsequently, found the John Goldsmith article.

To do really clever fill patterns, then you will need to use the grouped approach.

Dawgoneit!
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